Writing Fights Scenes 2: Dramatic Elements

by Matthew Lowes

Greek-Persian_duel

My last post dealt with the importance of understanding the tone of a fight scene, but there is something even more important. Real fighting, be it on a small or large scale is not inherently entertaining. In most cases, it’s disturbing and horrific. We’re drawn to the story of a good fight because of the dramatic engagement of the characters. Without drama, the action can be a bit tedious, downright boring, or even offensive.

Whether you’re writing something like the battle for Helm’s Deep or the duel between Hamlet and Leartes, the buildup to the fight is arguably more important than the fight itself. It is during the buildup that we come to understand why the fight matters. Ask yourself what’s at stake for your characters and in the larger context of your story. “The readiness is all,” Hamlet says at last, and because the entire story has built up to this moment, we are prepared for a fight of truly dramatic proportions.

Think of your fight scene as a kind of story within the story. It should be a necessary part of the overall narrative. It should have a beginning, a middle, and an end. It should have a setting, a plot, and characters. It goes without saying it should have external conflict, but it should also have internal conflict. These elements should be established in the buildup, so when the action starts they all come crashing together. The fight should be a climactic focal point for dramatic elements in the narrative.

In terms of plotting the action, things should never go as planned. There should always be surprises, turns in action driven by the elements in play. Perhaps reinforcements arrive, treachery unfolds, or fear strikes. A good fight will have at least one or two good turns, when the advantage shifts from one side to the other before the final victory or defeat.

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2 thoughts on “Writing Fights Scenes 2: Dramatic Elements

  1. Thanks for the tips. It just happens I was faced with a fight scene yesterday and I realized I had no clue how to proceed. This helps and it’s nice to be reminded it’s the build-up that really matters.

    • Christina, good luck with your fight scene! I find film is great for studying examples because you can digest them so quickly. I remember spending a evening watching Zulu to figure out how a great buildup makes for a great battle.

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