Tools of the Trade

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By Cheryl Owen-Wilson  

I think we can all agree—writing is a most solitary art form. While I can paint with a room full of other painters exchanging ideas and telling stories, when I write I require either complete silence or music of my own choosing. There is no one sitting behind me handing me ideas as my fingers fly over the keyboard or whispering suggested words when I am stuck in the middle of a too often used, tired cliché’. Close your eyes and visualize your picture of a writer. I’m certain they are sitting in seclusion, even in a noise filled coffee shop, brow furrowed, possibly staring at a blank white screen/page or hopefully they are frantically writing before the words disappear “poof” from their brain’s frontal lobe.

So given the seclusion of writing, I was quite taken aback when attending a recent event in which the speaker, an author, eschewed the benefits of “Writing Critique Groups”. Said author went around the table of attendees and asked. “Who belongs or has belonged to a writing critique group?

Of the roughly sixteen people in attendance I quickly ascertained most were new to the writing community. Three of us said we benefited from our writing groups, one said they did not, and the remainder had, as I mentioned, no experience. The author then proceeded to give a lengthy dissertation as to why she did not think writing groups were beneficial—her two main complaints were—too much socializing and not feeling her writing benefited from any critique another writer could offer. She also placed writing conferences in the same bucket—adding cost to her other arguments listed above. I sat stunned for the remainder of her presentation.

When I left the building my mind would not stop rebuking me for not speaking up on the benefits I personally have received from my 20 plus years in and out of writing groups. I kept envisioning those new writers in attendance who might—given the speaker’s vehement aversion—never know the many benefits I and many published authors I know, have obtained over the years.

Without  writing groups and conferences I would not have the readily available support of a wide community of writers, not to mention the value of life-long friendships. If you are at the beginning of your writing life, I feel these are valuable tools that will save you many hours of trial and error. With the way the industry is evolving I feel it’s more important than ever to have a strong, core network, and that can start at conferences or within writing groups. Following is a very brief synopsis of how my writing groups have benefited my continuing evolution as a writer, and artist:

Cheryl’s Writing Groups

The first 8 years—“Wild Women’s Writing Group”—We were four very green individuals who have remained friends to this day. Both fortunately and unfortunately we fell into the biggest pitfall—as mentioned by the guest author above—we became more of a social group. However, two of us have continued writing.   One of the four was only eighteen when she started, and may not have the 10+ books she has published today if not for this first writing group.

The next 12 years—“The Inklings”—While there have been months where this group did not exist it always rekindled and began again. Different individuals have populated it, but two of us have remained through it all. I can now count myself a published short story author, published illustrator and creator of a book cover. None of which would have happened without this current writing group. I can’t speak for them individually, but I can say they are each published as well. One member in this current group, began a career in a new genre due to the success another member was having in the genre.

I can also say, at this very busy stage of my life—family, day job, artist—without a writing group to hold me accountable to put words on a page I might not achieve even the small—by comparison to the others in our group—word count I do manage to turn in at each meeting. After each meeting—critiques in hand—I feel I’m one step closer to completing a short story—one step closer to finishing a novel—one page closer to having a larger audience read my stories.

Long ago I was given a very simple outline on how to begin a writing critique group. Here is how it has evolved over the years:

  • Meet the same time, same day of the week—weekly, bi-weekly, monthly—whatever works best for the group.
  • Keep the group number to 4-6 attendees.
  • Set a maximum word count based on the size of the group, and how long you wish the meeting to last.
  • The meetings are no host meetings. You are there to critique not to socialize—as I mentioned this is the biggest pitfall to a successful group.
  • Each member is to submit via email, what they wish to have critiqued by a specified date prior to the meeting.
  • Come to the meeting with printed copies you have already read, and which you have written your critiques upon.
  • At the meeting your submission will be read by another attendee—this is fabulous not only for individuals who have a hard time reading their writing in public—but there is great benefit in hearing your writing in a voice other than your own.
  • The person who reads will critique the piece first. You will then go around the room and each give additional commentary. If necessary have a timer for each critique. Please remember to comment on what you like as well.
  • The author is then given each copy—with the name of the person, who gave the critique, in the event they need further clarification—to take home so they can begin the fun of editing of their story or not. Remember your writing group is for your benefit.

It’s as simple as that. You say you’re not ready to have anyone critique your work? That’s fine too. But I personally think you’ll be missing out on what might be a lifeline to sanity. There really are other people out there who have voices in their heads wanting to live on the written page. Now, you can still go back to writing in solitude and seclusion and ignore everything I’ve just said, but I felt it important to say it.

Before you go, please give me your positive or negative experiences/thoughts regarding writing critique groups.

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9 thoughts on “Tools of the Trade

  1. Yes, yes yes. Critique groups can be invaluable. My writing was vastly improved with input from others, especially other professional, published writers. It all depends on the group. Its goal has to be to improve writing with the goal of publishing. If the goal is to have a warm and fuzzy encouraging hug no matter how bad the writing… well that might feel good, but your writing will remain mediocre at best… Thanks Cheryl

  2. I do not belong to a critique group. I want to join; I don’t want to join. I have benefitted greatly from conferences and some mini-critiques, but I can’t quite take the next step into a full fledged group. “Who would want me?” and “What if they hate my work?” but most of all, “I would then have to leave the house when I could be home writing” stop me every time. Sometimes I think I should persevere and others I figure what ain’t broke don’t need fixin’. Thanks for your insight.

    • Mollie thanks for your response. One of the members in our current group is a long time writer and has many publications in her bio. She says she likes the group for the simple connection to other writers, and I believe sometimes we do have something to give her in the way of critique. I’ve never been in a group where they are so critical that one feels unwanted or singled out for their unpolished piece. That said, it is always a work in progress getting the right mixture of people. Happy Writing!

  3. I’ve never belonged to one either but always been interested. Making your work available for critic can be terrifying because our hearts are on the page. It’s a lot like falling in love. You have to be brave enough to be completely vulnerable because the benefits can be priceless:)

    • Hi Mischa…It is well worth all the butterflies and trepidation for a writer who has never joined. I am certain it would be a positive in moving your writing forward. Keep Writing!

  4. First of all, thanks, Cheryl, for writing this. I have belonged to several groups and they have all helped in different ways at different times. I have learned about my strengths as well as my weaknesses and I have learned enormously reading other people’s work. I have made connections and friendships. They have kept me on track and humble as well as supported.

  5. Great post, Cheryl. I agree completely. The benefit of “fresh eyes” on my work is invaluable, but equally so is being able to commiserate once or twice a month with people who “get it”.

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