Let’s Talk Portals

by Cheryl Owen-Wilson

In a past blog I shared a poem titled “Portal Home”. Today I’d like to expand on the subject. Portals are similar to the cosmological concept of a wormhole and some portals actually work using wormholes. When writing science fiction or fantasy a magical “portal” can be used to take characters to another time and/or location.

Why use portals?

  •  It literally gets your character from one place to another.
  •  It is a kind of decompression chamber, allowing your readers to make the transition from the realistic to the fantastic. It tells the audience that the rules of the story world are about to change in a big way. The passageway says, “Loosen up; don’t apply your normal concept of reality to what you are about to see”. This is essential in a highly symbolic, allegorical form like fantasy or science fiction, whose underlying themes explore the importance of looking at life from new perspectives and finding possibilities in even the most ordinary of things.

This tool in writing has no limits.  Places linked to a portal can be:

  • A world between worlds (parallel world)
  • The past or future (time portal)
  • Other planes of existence (heaven or hell)

The beauty of this story device is once your character has gone through the portal you then have license to create multiple portals—portals within portals!

A few examples you will recognize are:

  • Rabbit holes (Alice In Wonderland)
  • Mirrors (Through The Looking Glass)
  • Cyclones (Wizard of Oz)
  • A wardrobe (The Lion, The Witch and the Ward)
  • A Chimney (Mary Poppins)
  • The Door in the Living Room (Coraline)
  • A Cairn Tunnel (Miss Peregrine’s Home for Peculiar Children)
  • A Wall at the Train Station (Harry Potter)
  • Television set (Pleasantville, Poltergeist)
  • A Rope Swing Across a River (Bridge To Terabithia)
  • A Science Lab (Back To The Future)
  • A world between worlds (Stanger Things)

What I enjoy most when using portals in my writing is I’m not only taking my readers/characters on a journey through space and time. I’ve also taken myself  “down the rabbit hole”.  Worlds are limitless and reality is whatever you choose it to be.  In my own writing somewhere deep in the swamps of southern Louisiana there is an Island void of present reality or the constraints of a date on a calendar.  Now while traveling to this Island may take you through a portal beware because one there you may encounter many more portals—through mirrors, dolls, juju’s, dreams—the possibilities are endless.

At this time of year most of us watch the infamous “A Christmas Carol”.    Which is your favorite movie?  Mine is an older version (1951) featuring Alastair Sim as Scrooge.

In “A Christmas Carol” Scrooge is transported from present, to past, to future.  In your opinion what was the portal used? What portals have you created in your own stories?

Cosmic Birth- Small

“Cosmic Birth” an original painting by Cheryl Owen-Wilson

In this painting I’ve imagined a cosmic tree of life giving birth to new worlds.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Labyrinth of Souls

by Elizabeth Engstrom

It’s Christmas, so what could be better than a little self-promotion?

If the self-promotion includes the genius of others, that’s what could be better.

If the self-promotion also includes the ease of Christmas shopping for loved ones, that’s better yet.

Several years ago, Matthew Lowes wrote quite a brilliant solitaire card game called Dungeon Solitaire—The Labyrinth of Souls.

rule book

After reading the rule book, and looking at the amazing art that had been done by Josephe Vandel for not only the book, but the Tarot cards to accompany it, I was inspired to write a novel set in this fictional universe.

cards

Matt and I talked with other authors, many alumni of the infamous Ghost Story Weekends, about writing similar books. Christina Lay signed on to publish, her feet already solidly planted by publishing the successful anthology Shadow Spinners: A Collection of Dark Tales, and voila! a series was born.

current books

The basic rules of the solitaire card game (and you can watch Matt play a few games on YouTube), is that the hero delves into the underground, where he encounters a labyrinth. The cards the player turns over dictate what the character encounters down there. Monsters. Treasure. Light. Food. Deity. Some things he must have, other things he must vanquish, or avoid. At some point he must turn around and have enough resources to return above ground. Sometimes he makes it, sometimes he doesn’t.

Each of these novels is set within this realm.  Each one is completely different from the other. There is only one requirement: the hero must delve underground at some point in his quest.

These novels by Matthew Lowes, Eric Witchey, Stephen T. Vessels, Christina Lay, Mary E. Lowd, L.A. Alber, and me (your obedient self-promoting servant), are really good reads. Littlest Death by Eric Witchey has won awards. They’re fun, they’re daring, they’re exciting, and they’re like nothing else you’ve ever read before. Fantasy with a twist, always with a twist. And there are more in the publishing pipeline by Cheryl Owen-Wilson, John Reed, Pamela Jean Herber, Cynthia Coate Ray, and others.

Treat yourself. Treat your loved ones.

What’s better than receiving a good book for Christmas?

Nothing. Seriously. There’s nothing better.